Canon

Canon EOS 200D EF-S 18-55mm IS STM Black New Launch

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Create Magical Moments

Lightweight, fun and easy to use, the Canon EOS Rebel SL2 camera further proves that quality is key, helping you capture stunning photos and videos you’ll love to see and share. The 24.2 Megapixel CMOS (APS-C) sensor and DIGIC 7 Image Processor deliver brilliantly sharp results, with Dual Pixel CMOS AF keeping your videos and photos in clear focus. Whether you’re taking selfies or vlogging, the Vari-angle Touch Screen LCD helps capture shots at a variety of angles and situations. A Feature Assistant function is available to help guide you through a shot if needed, and when you’re done you can share your creations on the spot thanks to built-in Wi-Fi®*, NFC** and Bluetooth®*** connectivity. Easy to bring and simple to operate, the EOS Rebel SL2 puts creative power in your hands.

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In India know as EOS200D

Key Features

The Canon EOS Rebel SL2 camera has a powerful 24.2 Megapixel CMOS (APS-C) sensor that can capture high-resolution images of immense quality in a wide variety of lighting situations. Take photos and videos with fine details and dynamic, rich colors from the deepest reds to emerald greens to lush blues and purples. Simply turn the camera on and feel confident that the results will be stunning whether they are being shared with your friends on social media or blown up into poster-sized prints.

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Line up the shot you want in Live View with virtually no wait for the EOS Rebel SL2 camera to focus thanks to Dual Pixel CMOS AF which helps deliver the world’s fastest autofocusing speed at 0.03 sec.^ Equipped with phase-detection, it can quickly and accurately determine how far away a subject is and where the lens should focus, and offers fast, smooth and precise autofocus that stays locked onto your subject, even if they are in motion, for both photos and videos. Dual Pixel CMOS AF helps ensure your results are sharp, keeps the time it takes to lock focus onto your subject to a minimum and smoothly maintains focus where you want it.

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The EOS Rebel SL2 camera features a Vari-angle Touch Screen LCD that can be ideal for composing and reviewing your photos. Tap the screen during Live View while taking photos or videos and thanks to Dual Pixel CMOS AF, the EOS Rebel SL2 will quickly lock focus to that location in the image. Touch gestures can be used for zooming in or swiping through images after you’ve taken them, and menu and quick control settings can be accessed quickly and easily. In addition, the Vari-angle Touch Screen LCD lets users utilize Selfie Mode with a touch of a button so you can capture high-quality selfie shots with ease.

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Built-in Wi-Fi®* Capability

The EOS Rebel SL2 camera is designed to make connecting to Wi-Fi®* fast and easy. It can exchange data with other Wi-Fi® compatible Canon cameras, and transfer files directly to a compatible smart device using the Camera Connect app. Just press the Wi-Fi® button and the camera will connect to Wi-Fi® allowing you to share and upload directly to various web services like CANON iMAGE GATEWAY#, Facebook® and YouTube® as well as print directly to compatible wireless Canon printers.

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Built-in NFC** Capability

 With its built-in NFC (Near Field Communication) capability**, the EOS Rebel SL2 camera connects directly to compatible Android devices as well as Canon’s Connect Station CS100 device by simply touching the NFC icon located on the camera to the device.

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Built-in Bluetooth®*** Capability

 Bluetooth®*** pairing helps you connect the camera to compatible smart devices using the free Canon Camera Connect app*. The Bluetooth® capability uses a low-energy connection that can be set to connect automatically upon discovery of the two devices and helps preserve battery life while maintaining a wireless connection. You can also establish a direct Wi-Fi® connection to use your phone as a viewfinder, as well as check and download previously captured photos and videos. In addition, Bluetooth® lets you connect to the optional Wireless Remote Control BR-E1 for remote shooting as well as pick up GPS shooting location data from the user’s compatible smartphone.

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The Canon EOS Rebel SL2 camera supports Full HD quality movies at 60p and can produce incredibly smooth moving images for playback, or for sharing videos on social media. Vloggers will appreciate the ease with which it can record quality audio that’s immediately ready for uploading. For even more sophisticated sound recording, the EOS Rebel SL2 has an external microphone input to complement its internal microphone.

sl2_feature_05.jpgThe DIGIC 7 Image Processor powers the Canon EOS Rebel SL2 camera to produce high image quality and fast operation, even in in low light. When using high ISO settings, the image processing helps keep results sharp and detailed in virtually any lighting situation. Powerful all around, the DIGIC 7 Image Processor helps ensure your photos and videos look sharp and lifelike with minimal noise or grain.

6dmk2_feature_04Especially useful when shooting in bright light, the Canon EOS Rebel SL2 camera incorporates a fully featured optical viewfinder with a wide-area, 9-point AF system designed to achieve sharp focus in an instant. This sophisticated AF system makes it easy to capture the action, no matter where the subject moves. 63-zone evaluative metering helps the EOS Rebel SL2 achieve optimal exposure with a diverse array of subjects and lighting conditions.

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With its Feature Assistant function, the EOS Rebel SL2 camera helps users take advantage of its advanced features and create impressive photos with ease. By explaining and illustrating the camera’s shooting modes and their effects with sample photos of each mode, Feature Assistant encourages experimentation and provides guidance for creating amazing photographs.

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The smallest and lightest EOS DSLR camera to feature both an APS-C sensor and a Vari-angle LCD, the EOS Rebel SL2 is easy to bring with you. With improvements in design and construction, the EOS Rebel SL2 is portable and lightweight with no compromise in performance. Its compact construction is accompanied by excellent usability, including a rounded grip that can sit comfortably in your hand. Conveniently sized for everyday use, the EOS Rebel SL2 means less missed opportunities and more memories preserved and shared in high image quality.

sl2_feature_09.jpgSo get ready to buy this most awaited DSLR from Canon from www.thirdidigital.in

 

Canon EOS 6D Mark II – an affordable full-frame DSLR

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Versatility Delivered

For superb performance on the go, the Canon EOS 6D Mark II camera puts full-frame performance into a compact, fully featured DSLR. Its 26.2 Megapixel CMOS sensor and DIGIC 7 Image Processor help deliver amazing results even at expanded ISO settings, making it great for challenging low-light situations as well as landscape, portrait and event photography. The EOS 6D Mark II also features an impressive optical viewfinder with 45 all cross-type AF points*, fast and accurate Dual Pixel CMOS AF and a Vari-angle Touch Screen LCD for Live View operation which helps create unique angles. With the EOS 6D Mark II’s speed to capture action and the versatility to create phenomenal photographs and Full HD 60p videos in numerous environments and lighting situations, the camera offers creative content makers a winning combination of advanced features in a portable package that’s as fun as it is powerful.

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The Canon EOS 6D Mark II features a 26.2 Megapixel full-frame CMOS sensor (approx. 35.9mm x 24.0mm) designed to create high-resolution and detailed images. Capable of sensitivities ranging from ISO 100 to ISO 40000 (expandable to L: 50 and H2: 102400), the EOS 6D Mark II’s sensor captures images of 6240 x 4160 pixels with a pixel size of 5.67 µm square for outstanding detail and a superb signal-to-noise ratio, resulting in great images. Combined with the EOS 6D Mark II’s compact and lightweight design, it helps make high-resolution photography easy and accessible.

6dmk2_feature_01.jpgFor next-level AF operation, the Canon EOS 6D Mark II camera has a wide-area, 45-point all cross-type AF system* which allows you to track fast subjects accurately throughout the frame and has low luminance performance to EV -3 which makes it excellent in dim light. Canon’s high-precision AF system, high-quality bright prism and Intelligent Viewfinder II let you see exactly what the lens sees. These features help provide instant information such as camera settings, with a limited chance of glare so you can easily see and quickly change settings on the spot no matter the shooting situation. The EOS 6D Mark II also features 5 types of AF area selection modes useful for a number of different AF situations.

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The Canon EOS 6D Mark II camera features Canon’s brilliant Dual Pixel CMOS AF for crisp Live View shooting. With two photodiodes per pixel capable of phase-difference detection autofocus, Dual Pixel CMOS AF delivers fast and accurate AF throughout the image plane. Able to detect shifts in movement at the pixel level, Dual Pixel CMOS AF enables continuous automatic AF and AF tracking that enhances overall camera operation for sharp still images and smooth, accurate focus transitions in movies, even at Full HD 60p.

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The DIGIC 7 Image Processor powers the Canon EOS 6D Mark II camera to produce high image quality and fast operation, even in in low light. The camera features a wide range of ISO 100–40000 for still and videos and it can help keep results sharp and detailed in virtually any lighting situation. Powerful all around, the EOS 6D Mark II can produce beautiful images even where light is limited.

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The Canon EOS 6D Mark II is the first full-frame Canon EOS DSLR camera to have a Vari-angle Touch Screen 3.0-inch ClearView LCD II monitor for composing and reviewing photos and movies with ease. Its touch sensitive controls make it easy to select and adjust focus, menu and quick control settings with a touch of a finger. Two-finger touch gestures can be used for zooming or changing images. The 1.04 million dot LCD monitor is constructed to help minimize reflections and treated with a smudge-resistant coating for a bright, clear and easily viewable display.

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Built-in Wi-Fi®** Connectivity

For a useful and quick workflow in a variety of locations, the Canon EOS 6D Mark II camera’s built-in Wi-Fi®** feature can help streamline camera operations across the board. Using the free Canon Camera Connect app** on a compatible iOS® or Android™ device, the EOS 6D Mark II can easily be set up to shoot remotely from a distance, even in Live View mode, with complete control of settings such as aperture, shutter speed, ISO, focus and shutter release. Image review and transfer are similarly fast and easy without having to take the camera out of its bag. Still images can even be transferred between two wireless-enabled Canon cameras over a Local Area Network (LAN). Images and video can also be uploaded instantly to CANON iMAGE GATEWAY# for easy sharing on social networking sites, and photos can even be printed on a wireless PictBridge-certified printer without the need for a PC.

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Built-in NFC*** Capability

Built-in NFC*** (Near Field Communication) technology helps provide the Canon EOS 6D Mark II camera with a virtually seamless connection to compatible Android™ devices***. Simply tap to connect and transfer images and videos. It’s also compatible with the Canon Connect Station CS100 device, which makes it simple for photographers and moviemakers to view and organize all their photos and videos on one connected device.

6dmk2_feature_06b.jpgBuilt-in Bluetooth®^ Capability

Bluetooth®^ pairing helps you connect the camera to compatible smart devices using the free Canon Camera Connect app. The Bluetooth® capability uses a low-energy connection that can be set to connect automatically upon pairing of the two devices and helps preserve battery life while maintaining a wireless connection. Bluetooth® lets you quickly and easily connect the EOS 6D Mark II camera to the optional Wireless Remote Control BR-E1 for remote shooting.

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Built-in GPS^^ Capability

When you’re capturing images while traveling on vacation or if you’re on the job, GPS has become an important and valuable tool. The EOS 6D Mark II camera’s built-in GPS helps content creators both tag their images with critical location data, and also adjust the time and timestamp on the camera automatically. Since it’s compatible with American GPS satellites, Russian GLONASS satellites and Japanese quasi-zenith satellites Michibiki, the GPS information can stay consistent and accurate.

6dmk2_feature_06d.jpgThe EOS 6D Mark II camera is designed to keep up with the action. Its remarkable shutter, advanced AF and exposure and image processing systems help ensure virtually instantaneous response and performance at up to 6.5 fps^^^, even at full resolution. Whether searching for candid moments at a wedding or capturing an athlete’s explosive motion, the EOS 6D Mark II doesn’t let file size compromise the speed of capture even when bracketing exposures of a complex lighting situation, helping photographers and moviemakers consistently attain high-quality and sharp images.

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The EOS 6D Mark II camera is built for uninterrupted performance, even when conditions get messy. The battery compartment cover, card slot cover, lens mount, terminal covers and buttons are weather-sealed to help keep water and dust out. The EOS 6D Mark II’s high precision aluminum alloy and polycarbonate resin construction ensures a lightweight and durable camera that gives you the confidence to use in various situations.

6dmk2_feature_08.jpgNow where to buy just wait it is being sold soon on www.thirdidigital.in

Some different Techniques for Creative Photography…

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Long Exposure Photography

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There are essentially two basic ways of capturing these shots; with or without a polarizing or neutral density (ND) filter. Either method requires a tripod, as these shots involve too much open shutter time to attempt holding by hand. The object is to increase your exposure time for the shot without overexposing the image.

Longer exposure times allow you to capture clouds, water, or other moving objects in a smooth, flowing manner, while maintaining sharpness and clarity on still objects. A neutral density filter essentially allows for this extended amount of exposure time, without altering the hue or color of the image. Adding the filter is equivalent to stopping down one or more f-stops, and allows you to avoid making the photo too hot due to the amount of time the shutter will be open.

If you don’t have a ND or polarizing filter available, you’ll need to attempt these captures in lower light, such as in the early morning or late evening (it could be said that if possible, you shouldn’t be shooting at any other time anyway). Many photographers use long exposures to capture shots at night.

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Begin experimenting with very small apertures during the golden hour (the hour before sunset or after sunrise) such as f/22 or higher, and bump the aperture up to f/8 or larger after night falls. You’ll end up with several attempts, since nailing a great exposure is largely trial and error. You’ll also need to play around with exposure times, and this depends on what moving object you are capturing.

Clouds need much longer times to properly capture their trek across the frame of the shot; 5 minutes is a good place to start. Rolling or crashing waves at a beach require much less, sometimes 15 to 30 seconds is enough to create the necessary motion in the image.

Light Painting

Light painting is probably the fastest growing technique seen these days, and for good reason; the creative possibilities are endless, and can make for some stunningly beautiful art when done correctly. At its core, light painting is another long-exposure technique that utilises in-frame or out-of-frame light sources to create patterns within the photo or illuminate an object in specific locations.

It is possible for the artist to actually perform the painting in front of the camera without appearing in the final shot, due to the ratio of time the photographer is painting to the actual exposure duration.

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How to do:

Any number of light sources can be used, although generally flashlights are the most common. Light pens, candles, and various fiber optics can be used as well. The sky is the limit, use your imagination! Like with other long-exposure photography methods, a tripod must be used. Set your camera for a long exposure (30 seconds or more), and use a remote shutter release if available (or the timer function available on almost all cameras will work as well).

The actual location you shoot in should be as dark as possible, obviously working at night is best. We want the object you’re drawing or highlighting to stand out as much as possible against the dark background. Since we’re shooting a long exposure, we can set our aperture to a smaller setting; start with f/8 to f/16 and experiment from there. This will ensure crisper shots with a full field of depth.

If you are not painting a stationary object within the frame, you can stand facing the camera, and draw a figure with the light source on. Try to physically stay in frame for as little time as possible, this will help ensure you don’t show up in the final shot. If painting an object, you can highlight various parts with your light source, turning the light off and on as you go to target specific areas.

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                                                              HDR Photography

Although not quite as popular today as it was a few years ago, HDR photography is still a relevant artform. HDR shots are finished through your post-processing workflow, but start with your photography itself. HDR stands for High Dynamic Range, and refers to the range of dark and light levels we see in a photograph.
Modern cameras, even the most expensive models, lack the dynamic range we have in our own eyes. We humans are able to see a much broader range of colors and light levels. This is partially why scenes in photographs never quite appear as they did when we saw them for ourselves.

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High dynamic range imaging is a technique that can help extend the range of levels beyond what our camera can normally capture. This is done by taking multiple shots of the same scene, at varying exposure levels, and combining them in our post-processing later. By doing this, we ensure that we’ll see the darker levels and colors as they should appear, as well as the lighter levels without the blown-out colors. Although many software suites (including Adobe Photoshop) offer a “one-shot” HDR tool that does not require multiple exposures, the results are usually not as accurate and dynamic as a true HDR photo.

How to do:

Dynamic range in a photo is measured in EV, or exposure value, and is equivalent to one f stop; each increase of one EV doubles the amount of light captured, while each decrease of EV cuts it in half. Originally, a minimum of three images were shot, one being very underexposed, one properly exposed, and another overexposed, or blown out. However, most modern DSLR’s now have an AEB, or auto-bracketing setting. This allows you to set up a number of shots with a predefined EV range.

After being set, the photographer can press the shutter release once for each exposure, completing the range of shots in one instance. Whichever method you prefer, you’ll need to capture each image with a set EV difference between them for best results. Smaller EV values (such as 1) will result in less dynamic and drastic images than using 2 or 3 EV’s between each exposure.

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After the images have been captured, the process will need to be completed using software. Adobe Photoshop does offer an HDR assembly action that layers the exposures together, but I’ve found the results tend to be poor, and pale in comparison to a proper HDR-specific software package, such as HDRSoft Photomatix. Available for Windows and Mac systems, Photomatix has become an extremely popular standard for processing HDR shots.

                                                                     Panoramic
Panoramic photography is another example of a method that has vastly increased in ease of use over time. What was once a long, tedious process in a darkroom, hunkering over photo paper, making cuts and separations to multiple photos, is now as simple as a click of a button on your camera.
Panoramic photos are simply multiple shots of a single scene that have been stitched together to form a continuous image. Even with a wide-angle lens, we can only capture so much of a particular scene. By taking multiple shots, we can combine those later and create a photo with a much wider field of view than previously possible.

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How to do:

There are many cameras nowadays that have a panorama feature; this basically gives you guides and grids on your viewfinder or screen that make it easy to line up your shots. A horizontal photo can be taken by shooting, moving the camera to the left or right (while keeping it level), and taking another shot when the panorama assist shows that you are only minimally overlapping the previous shot. This overlap is necessary to prevent missing a slice of the scene in the final image. The assist usually shows your last shot, and what your current frame looks like next to it; this helps you create a set of accurate images to start with.

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Some cameras, especially older DSLR’s, don’t have this feature, and the individual photos will have to be taken manually. This involves alot of guesswork and trial and error. Thankfully, some tools exist to help, specifically panoramic heads, or pano-heads. This is an attachment that sits on top of your tripod head and allows the camera to be rotated around a single axis (instead of the camera itself rotating on a single plane), and eliminates parallax. Parallax is a anomaly that occurs due to differing angles of viewing in a line of sight, and is not something we want in our final photo. Having a panoramic head allows smooth transitions to the next photo, and usually feature stops in regular increments to properly measure the angle of the next shot.

                                                        Macro Photography
Macro photography isn’t just popular now; it’s been popular for many years. There’s something intriguing about seeing everyday objects in a way that you never get to see, extremely up close and personal. The beautiful thing about shooting macro is the variety; you can shoot almost anything close up and come away with something totally different.

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Macro photography is a bit more equipment-centric than most other methods, meaning for the most part you can’t just go out with whatever you have as your default lens and take great close-up shots. The best results come with having the proper equipment, whether it be lenses, tubes, or reversing rings. That’s not to say you have to spend a small fortune to get the shot you want; many methods of macro shooting can be accomplished using inexpensive equipment. There are generally four categories of equipment that will help you capture those itty bitty details you’re looking for.

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If you’re serious about macro, the best way to go is by purchasing a dedicated macro lens. This is, of course, the most expensive option. These lenses are available in various focal lengths, generally from 50mm to 200mm. Macro lenses are specifically made for this type of photography, featuring a long barrel that accommodates extremely close focusing.

As a general rule, the longer the focal length of the lens, the more distance between yourself and the subject you’ll have available. To capture the details of a butterfly, for example, a 50mm lens would require you to move in much too close. For close-ups of a flower, however, a 50mm would work perfectly. As with any lens, varying degrees of build quality are available.

Reversing Rings

Reversing rings do just that; they simply allow you to screw your existing lens on your camera body backwards. A camera lens fitted properly is intended to take what it sees and size it down to be recorded on the camera’s sensor; reversing the lens does the opposite, working much like a microscope.

One major caveat to note here, since you’ll no longer have the electronic pins aligned, you’ll lose any automatic or electronic features such as aperture control or automatic focusing. On the upside, you’ll have a dirt-cheap method of getting extremely close and capturing ridiculous depth of field;

Extension Tubes

Extension tubes are another inexpensive way of getting up close. These are hollow pieces that increase the space between your camera body and your lens, which allows the lens to focus closer. These tubes usually come in sets of three different lengths, so you can choose which lengths to use or combine them for some fairly extreme results. You’ll probably struggle a bit with the razor-thin depth of field.

Close Up Filters.

Technically, these are filters, not lenses. Just like a neutral density or polarizing filter, these inexpensive pieces screw onto your existing lens. They are cheap, but since they are technically filters, the quality is usually not the best; any screw-on type filter degrades image quality by some degree.

So now enjoy this new techniques in the rainy season.

 

Composition Tips, to make your pictures more interesting

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One of the first qualities of a photo that catches and captures a viewer’s eye is the composition. Great composition is something that immediately separates the amateurs from the pros and enthusiasts. How you place various objects in the photographic frame determines the composition and works tremendously toward creating a feeling greater than what the object would convey in the real world. Composition is one of the most important elements of the craft of photography, and it is a skill that can be taught and honed through extensive exercise and persistent practice.

Fill The Frame / Cropping
If your shot is in danger of losing impact due to a busy background/surroundings, crop in tight around your main point of focus, eliminating the background so all attention falls on your main subject. This works particularly well with portraits when you’re trying to capture something more intimate and focused or are shooting in a busy location where what’s around them would just cause a distraction. Filling the frame could involve you capturing them from the waist up or for more impact, fill the frame with just their face. Patterns are another subject that when capturing, you should fill the frame with, aligning it up carefully to ensure it’s straight.

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To raise the quality of your photos you must make sure that the main subject is of heightened interest and is effectively positioned in the frame to draw the viewer’s eye exactly to where you want it, and emphasize that subject. This can be done in a variety of creative, artistic and symbolic ways. Size, color, shape and how the object contrasts with the rest of the elements in the image (foreground, middle ground and background) are ways to isolate and direct attention to the subject.

Balanced Layout including the Subject with other Elements

The layout of your images influences how visually effective or stimulating your photos will be. When composing your photo, seek a balance in the color, the lighting, and object placement within the frame’s constricting rectangle. When we talk about “balance” in a photograph, we mean a composition that has arranged the visual elements in such a way as to be pleasing to the eye. We’ve all seen group photos (of friends and family) in which the subjects are stuck in the center of the frame with no apparent design other than to fit everyone in the frame, and without regard to effectively filling the frame either. This typical shot lacks interesting composition in the layout, and there’s probably way too much empty space above their heads as well. You seek to achieve interesting composition and perspective by being creative with where and how you physically position the camera, such that the composition has a unique perspective, or view of the world. For example, if you put the camera at the level of the floor when your pet or baby approaches the camera, that photo has a much more interesting composition and perspective than if the camera were held at full height while looking down at the pet or baby. Like many art concepts, perspective and composition is either instinctual, or it can be developed through practice and study.

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Keep an eye on the edges of your frame to make sure the person/animal you’re photographing hasn’t had any of their body parts chopped off by it. Cutting off your cat’s tail, your dog’s ears or even part of your model’s head, will not only spoil your shot, the unintentional limb chopping can pull attention away from what the viewer should really be looking at.

What is all about Rule of Third

Understand The Rule Of Thirds
The most basic of all photography rules is all about dividing your shot into nine equal sections by a set of vertical and horizontal lines. With the imaginary frame in place, you should place the most important element(s) in your shot on one of the lines or where the lines meet. It’s a technique that works well for landscapes as you can position the horizon on one of the horizontal lines that sit in the lower and upper part of the photograph while you’re vertical subjects (trees etc.) can be placed on one of the two vertical lines.

compo3.jpgThis is an artistic concept that photographers lifted from painters, which one uses a frame (like a water, the boatman, & Sky ) within the overall frame to further isolate an object/subject. The key to using a frame within a frame is to make sure that the frame is distinct in shape and lines, and is in sharp focus. Your viewer’s attention will immediately be taken to exactly what you want them to see by using this technique.

Keep your depth of Field view 

Make The Most Of Lead In Lines / ShapesOur eyes are unconsciously drawn along lines in images so by thinking about how, where and why you place lines in your images will change the way your audience view it. A road, for example, starting at one end of the shot and winding its way to the far end will pull the eye through the scene. You can position various focal points along your line or just have one main area focus at the end of your line that the eye will settle on. Shapes can be used in a similar way, for example imagine a triangle and position three points of focus at the end of each point where the lines of the shape meet. By doing so you create balance in your shot as well as subtly guiding the eye.

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A photograph can have a blurry foreground or background, so this special optical property can enhance the composition of your photos by further isolating the main subject from everything else around it. You can blur the background or foreground by having command over the depth of field, which is controlled by the lens’ aperture, focal length and object’s distance from the lens. Mastering this skill is critical for more interesting images. The wider apertures (f/1.4 to f/2.8) effectively reduce DOF, as do longer focal length lenses

Create the effect of The Background Magic

Unsightly objects, overexposed or particularly bright areas and blocks/dots of bright colour will all pull the eye from what it’s meant to be focusing on so take a good look at your background before you take your shot and if possible, find a background that’s not so obtrusive. If you’re working on portraits make sure there’s no unwanted items sticking out of your subject’s head and unless it adds to the shot, throw the background out of focus. To do this, select a wider aperture if working with a DSLR or select the Portrait Mode on a compact camera to tell it you want to work with a wider aperture.

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Perspective is how the photographer views the objects in the camera frame via the placement of the camera. For example, the same subject will have different perspectives when photographed at eye level, from above or from ground level. By varying the perspective you change the placement of the horizon line and you influence your audience’s perception of the scene. For example, if you placed the camera on the ground level to take a full-body photo of someone, and angled the camera up to fill the frame with your subject, he or she will appear much more menacing, powerful and larger than if the camera was held at eye-level. Another way to look at differing perspective is to utilize camera positions that are atypical to what the human eye sees. Bird’s eye views or extremely high angles change the dynamics of your composition.

So let us conclude with 1 Mantra , Keep it Simple

The concept of less is more lends itself effectively to just about everything, and photography is no exception. Overly complicated or complex photographic composition has the same problem as compound complicated sentences in writing, which make it difficult for the audience to understand and appreciate the idea that is trying to be conveyed. Simple in this context doesn’t mean simplistic, but rather lacking unnecessary elements that confuse or are redundant. In photography creating uncluttered, but distinct compositions simplify yet enhance the delivery of the idea. The mind’s eye of the viewer can do all the heavy lifting.

 

 

Depth of Field the most important factor in photography.

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This images when you see you wonder why is it looking so good and attractive without any good face or scenery, yes you are right it is the way it is taken is why it looks so attractive.

You may have heard the term depth of field (DoF), but if you are new to photography you may not yet be taking advantage of how DoF can enhance your photos. A basic definition of depth of field is: the zone of acceptable sharpness within a photo that will appear in focus. In every picture there is a certain area of your image in front of, and behind the subject that will appear in focus.

This zone will vary from photo to photo. Some images may have very small zones of focus which is called shallow depth of field. Others may have a very large zone of focus which is called deepdepth of field. Three main factors that will affect how you control thedepth of field of your images are: aperture (f-stop), distance from the subject to the camera, and focal length of the lens on your camera. Let’s explain you in little more detail.

How does aperture control depth of field?

Aperture refers to the access given to light from the lens to the camera sensors. The size of your aperture (the diameter of the hole through which light enters the camera) controls the amount of light entering your lens. Using the aperture (f-stop) of your lens is the simplest way to control your depth of field as you set up your shot.

Large aperture = Small f-number = Shallow (small) depth of field
Small aperture = Larger f-number = Deeper (larger) depth of field

It may be easier to remember this simple concept: The lower your f-number, the smaller your depth of field. Likewise, the higher your f-number, the larger your depth of field. For example, using a setting of f/2.8 will produce a very shallow depth of field while f/11 will produce a deeper DoF.

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How does distance control depth of field?

The closer your subject is to the camera, the shallower your depth of field becomes. Therefore, moving further away from your subject will deepen your depth of field.

How does the focal length of a lens control depth of field?

Focal Length refers to the capability of a lens to magnify the image of a distant subject. This can get complicated, but the simple answer is that the longer you set your focal length the shallower the depth of field. Example: Your subject is 10 meters (33 feet) away, using a focal length of 50mm at f/4; your depth of field range would be from 7.5 -14.7 meters (24.6-48 feet) for a total DOF of 7.2 meters (23.6 feet). If you zoom into 100mm from the same spot, the depth of field changes to 9.2-10.9m (30.1-35.8′) for a total of 1.7m (5.7′) of depth of field. But if you move to 20m (66′) away from your subject using the 100mm lens, your depth of field is almost the same as it would be at 10 meters using a 50mm lens.

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Depth of filed image using a 50MM F1.4 Lens

Can I just have a point and shoot camera, or don’t know how to change those settings?

Even with a point and shoot camera, there are ways to control your depth of field. In the Scene Modes menu, look for a symbol of a human head, which is the setting for portraits. This will give you a narrow depth of field. In the same menu there is also a mountain symbol, which is a setting for landscapes, which will give you a deeper depth of field.

If you are a beginner with a DSLR there are some simple ways you can control depth of field and still use and automatic shooting mode. By choosing Aperture Priority mode you can set your aperture to get the depth of field that you want, and the camera will automatically set the shutter speed.

Can I vary the depth of field exactly for each situation?

Yes, but because changing your aperture affects your shutter speed, the result may not meet the needs of your image. For instance, if you are trying to increase your depth of field by reducing aperture size you will also need to increase (slow down) your shutter speed which could make your image blurry. Understanding how all these settings work together can increase your control over depth of field.

Is depth of field equally distributed in front and back of my focus point?

No, it’s usually about one third in front and two thirds behind your focal point, but as your focal length increases it becomes more equal.

How Does the depth of field improve my images?

Managing depth of field is one of the most important tools at your disposal, because having tack sharp images is one of the most important factors to getting that great shot. Knowing how to make the parts of your image you want sharp and the parts you want to be out of focus, is a great artistic tool to create great images.

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Using 300 MM F2.8  Lens

What and How to use shallow depth of field?

Using a shallow depth of field is a good way to make your subject stand out from its background and is great for portrait photography. Shallow DoF can also be useful in wildlife photography, where you want the subject to stand out from its surroundings. This is also useful because many wildlife photo opportunities are low light situations, and increasing your aperture size will give you more light. Shallow depth of field is also effective for sports photography where many times you want to separate the athlete from the background to bring attention to them. The result of this should also help give you a fast enough shutter speed to freeze the action.

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Shallow Depth of Field

When is deeper depth of field useful.

In landscape photography it is important to get as much of your scene in focus as possible. By using a wide angle lens and a small aperture you will be able maximize your depth of field to get your scene in focus.

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See the difference in variance of depth of field settings

How to determine depth of field?

There are several on-line sites that will provide depth of field charts for your camera and lenses. Also, there are a number of apps available for smart phone users that can calculate it for you while you’re in the field. Most cameras have a DoF preview button which will give you a preview as you look through the eye piece. (This is probably the easiest and most under-utilized method.) Using this button may cause your image to appear darker as you view it through the eye piece, but not to worry. Your image will be properly exposed as long as you have the correct exposure settings.

Can we get entire Image in Focus and have a good Depth of Field ?

Yes, using what is called the hyperfocal distance. When you are focused at the hyperfocal distance, your depth of field will extend from half the distance to your focal point to infinity. Use a DOF calculator to find your hyperfocal distance. If you don’t have a DoF calculator, a good rule of thumb is to focus a third of the way into the scene. Using an aperture of about f/11 or higher with a wide angle lens will maximize your depth of field.

How to use Depth of Field in Macro Photography.

Because most macro images are produced in low light and with a longer focal length, the depth of field is often very shallow. Adjust your lens to the smallest aperture that the light will allow. It may also be necessary to increase your ISO to allow you to properly expose the image and to maximize your depth of field. Still, in many macro images your DoF may be very minute. With this very narrow focus it becomes necessary to use a tripod, because even the slightest movement of the camera will move your macro subject outside your depth of field.

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Beetle on the Flower with hue of colours

Bokeh, the most admired feature

Bokeh (boh-ke) comes from the Japanese word meaning blur. This effect is produced by the out-of-focus areas in your image that are beyond the depth of field. Bokeh commonly refers to the pleasing circle shapes caused by the shape of the lens aperture. Usually created when shooting with your aperture wide open, such as f/2.8, bokeh can also be created with smaller apertures if the background is distant enough.

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Bokeh using F1.2

Lets

summarize controlling depth of field:

Increase depth of field

  • Narrow your aperture (larger f-number)
  • Move farther from the subject
  • Shorten focal length

Decrease depth of field

  • Widen your aperture (smaller f-number)
  • Move closer to the subject
  • Lengthen your focal length

Take control of your depth of field. Understanding how these adjustments control your it will greatly improve your photography.

Happy Photography

 

Lets Explore the ISO in Photography.

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The Right ISO The ISO setting determines how sensitive your camera is to light and also how fine the grain of your image. The ISO we choose depends on the situation – when it’s dark we need to push the ISO up to a higher number, say anything from 400 – 3200 as this will make the camera more sensitive to light and then we can avoid blurring. On sunny days we can choose ISO 100 or the Auto setting as we have more light to work with.

It is challenging to take good pictures without a good understanding of how ISO works and what it does. Camera ISO is one of the three pillars of photography (the other two being Aperture and Shutter Speed) and every photographer should thoroughly understand it, to get the most out of their equipment. We will try to explain ISO as simple as I can.

Before we go any further, you should first understand how DSLR cameras work.

1) What is ISO?

In very basic terms, ISO is the level of sensitivity of your camera to available light. The lower the ISO number, the less sensitive it is to the light, while a higher ISO number increases the sensitivity of your camera. The component within your camera that can change sensitivity is called “image sensor” or simply “sensor”. It is the most important (and most expensive) part of a camera and it is responsible for gathering light and transforming it into an image. With increased sensitivity, your camera sensor can capture images in low-light environments without having to use a flash. But higher sensitivity comes at an expense – it adds grain or “noise” to the pictures.

ISO-200-and-ISO-3200

The difference is clear – the image on the right hand side at ISO 3200 has a lot more noise in it, than the one on the left at ISO 200.

Every camera has something called “Base ISO”, which is typically the lowest ISO number of the sensor that can produce the highest image quality, without adding noise to the picture. Some older Nikon DSLRs and a number of other modern cameras such as the Fuji X-T2 have a base ISO of 200, whereas most modern Nikon and Canon digital cameras have a base ISO of 100. So, optimally, you should always try to stick to the base ISO to get the highest image quality. However, it is not always possible to do so, especially when working in low-light conditions.

Typically, ISO numbers start from 100-200 (Base ISO) and increment in value in geometric progression (power of two). So, the ISO sequence is: 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400 and etc. The important thing to understand, is that each step between the numbers effectively doubles the sensitivity of the sensor. So, ISO 200 is twice more sensitive than ISO 100, while ISO 400 is twice more sensitive than ISO 200. This makes ISO 400 four times more sensitive to light than ISO 100, and ISO 1600 sixteen times more sensitive to light than ISO 100, so on and so forth. What does it mean when a sensor is sixteen times more sensitive to light? It means that it needs sixteen times less time to capture an image!

ISO Speed Example:
ISO 100 – 1 second
ISO 200 – 1/2 of a second
ISO 400 – 1/4 of a second
ISO 800 – 1/8 of a second
ISO 1600 – 1/15 of a second
ISO 3200 – 1/30 of a second

In the above ISO Speed Example, if your camera sensor needed exactly 1 second to capture a scene at ISO 100, simply by switching to ISO 3200, you can capture the same scene at 1/30th of a second! That can mean a world of difference in photography, since it can help to avoid camera shake or motion blur.

Take a look at this picture:

Black-Skimmers

       NIKON D700 @ 420mm, ISO 800, 1/2000, f/5.6

These Black Skimmers at 1/2000th of a second at ISO 800. So my camera sensor needed 1/2000th of a second to fully freeze the birds while they were in flight. Now what would have happened if I had ISO 100 on my camera instead? My sensor would have needed 8 times more time to capture the same scene, which is 1/250th of a second. At that speed, I would have introduced motion blur into my picture, because the birds were moving faster than that. In short, I would have ruined the picture.

2) When to Use Low ISO

As I have said above, you should always try to stick to the lowest ISO (base ISO) of your camera, which is typically ISO 100 or 200, whenever possible. When there is plenty of light, you should use the lowest ISO to retain the most amount of detail and to have the highest image quality. There are some cases where you might want to use low ISO in dim or dark environments – for example, if you have your camera mounted on a tripod or sitting on a flat, non-moving surface. In that case, bear in mind that your camera will most likely need more time to capture the scene and anything that is moving is probably going to look like a ghost:

3) When to Increase ISO

You should increase the ISO when there is not enough light for the camera to be able to quickly capture an image. Anytime I shoot indoors without a flash, I set my ISO to a higher number to be able to capture the moment without introducing blur to the image. Another case where you might want to increase ISO is when you need to get ultra-fast shots, like the bird picture I posted above. Before increasing the ISO though, you should first decide if it is OK for you to introduce some noise to the image. Remember, the bigger the ISO number, the more noise you will see in your images.

On many of the newer cameras, there is a setting for “Auto ISO“, which works great in low-light environments. The beauty of this setting, is that you can set maximum ISO to a certain limit, so when ISO is automatically increased based on the amount of ambient light, it does not cross the set limit. So, if I want to limit the amount of grain in my pictures, I typically set maximum ISO to something like 800 or 1600 on most entry-level cameras and I can push that number even higher on higher-end full-frame cameras.

 

 

Canon unveils 5D Mark IV

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The Canon EOS 5D Series is perhaps one of the most recognisable camera lines of the digital age and the Mark IV is designed to appeal to the same wide range of enthusiasts and professionals.

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Nearly identical-looking to its successor, it receives significant upgrades under the hood, including: a higher-resolution sensor with Dual Pixel autofocus, 4K video capture, an upgraded AF system, a touchscreen, improved weather-sealing, built-in Wi-Fi/NFC and GPS. All this adds up to a camera that fits into Canon’s product line nicely as the all-around full-frame option.

It is built around a new 30.4MP CMOS sensor and uses the Digic 6+ processor. The AF system is from the flagship 1D X Mark II and contains 61 AF points (41 of which are cross-type) with up to 24% expanded vertical coverage compared with the system in the Mark III. The centre point is sensitive to -3EV in One Shot (AF-S) mode (in Live View the sensor is sensitive to -4EV with a fast lens).

4K video capture is a welcome addition to this camera and users can record in either 24 or 30p, albeit with a 1.64x crop. All footage is captured as Motion JPEG. Additionally, the camera allows for 4K Frame Grabs, effectively giving users 30 fps stills shooting with (Dual Pixel) AF. The usefulness of this may depend on how well-controlled the camera’s rolling shutter is, and how acceptable 8.8MP, ~17:9 JPEGs are to you, but we’ve been impressed by how effective 4K/60p video capture on the 1D X II has been for capturing the decisive moment still.

While developing the IV, Canon says it sought comment from 5D-series users and found that dynamic range, resolution, AF precision and AF speed were the four most important areas improvements were requested. On paper, the Mark IV seems to address these aspects nicely:

Canon 5D Mark IV Key Specifications

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  • New 30.4MP CMOS full-frame sensor with Dual Pixel AF
  • DCI 4K 30/24p video using Motion JPEG + 4K Frame Grab
  • 61-point AF system with 41 cross-type sensors (center point sensitive to -3 EV)
  • Dual Pixel AF (sensitive to -4EV) for continuous Servo AF in stills (first for a full-frame Canon camera) and video
  • ISO 100-32000 (expandable to 102400)
  • 7 fps continuous shooting
  • Dual Pixel Raw (image micro adjustment, bokeh shift, ghosting reduction)
  • 150,000-pixel RGB+IR metering sensor
  • 1.62M-dot 3.2″ full-time touchscreen
  • Wi-Fi w/ NFC + GPS
  • Built-in bulb timer interval timers
  • Improved weather-sealing

The 30.4MP chip offers a decent jump in resolution over the 22.3MP chip in 5D III. And judging from the improved dynamic range in Canon’s other recent DSLRs (the 80D and 1D X II), expect Raw dynamic range in the IV to be much improved over its predecessor, which had some of the worst shadow noise and banding we’d seen in a modern full-frame digital camera. The improvement is thanks to the recent move to a design that uses on-chip analog to-digital-conversion, resulting in lower downstream read noise and therefore less shadow noise and better overall dynamic range at lower ISOs.

In terms of AF, the increased coverage area is definitely a big deal: after all, it’s the exact same AF system found in the company’s flagship sports camera. The 150,000-pixel RGB-IR metering sensor, which feeds scene information to the AF system, is borrowed from the original 1D X, bringing enhanced subject identification (including faces) and tracking (‘iTR’), as well as improved metering and flicker detection.

Compared to its legacy

Canon now offers a range of full-frame models. On the high end you have the Canon’s sports and action-oriented 1D X Mark II, with its 20.2MP sensor and 14 fps continuous shooting (with AF). The 5DS (and ‘R’ variant), with their 50.6MP sensors, are the company’s high resolution options. The 5D Mark IV splits the difference in terms of resolution and is positioned as Canon’s all-rounder. For those on a budget, the compact EOS 6D soldiers on, four years after its introduction.

The new Canon EOS 5D Mark IV must be available post Photokina in the market by September 2016 end and will be available on www.thirdidigital.in

Canon 5D Mark IV