Canon DSLR

Canon EOS 200D EF-S 18-55mm IS STM Black New Launch

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Create Magical Moments

Lightweight, fun and easy to use, the Canon EOS Rebel SL2 camera further proves that quality is key, helping you capture stunning photos and videos you’ll love to see and share. The 24.2 Megapixel CMOS (APS-C) sensor and DIGIC 7 Image Processor deliver brilliantly sharp results, with Dual Pixel CMOS AF keeping your videos and photos in clear focus. Whether you’re taking selfies or vlogging, the Vari-angle Touch Screen LCD helps capture shots at a variety of angles and situations. A Feature Assistant function is available to help guide you through a shot if needed, and when you’re done you can share your creations on the spot thanks to built-in Wi-Fi®*, NFC** and Bluetooth®*** connectivity. Easy to bring and simple to operate, the EOS Rebel SL2 puts creative power in your hands.

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In India know as EOS200D

Key Features

The Canon EOS Rebel SL2 camera has a powerful 24.2 Megapixel CMOS (APS-C) sensor that can capture high-resolution images of immense quality in a wide variety of lighting situations. Take photos and videos with fine details and dynamic, rich colors from the deepest reds to emerald greens to lush blues and purples. Simply turn the camera on and feel confident that the results will be stunning whether they are being shared with your friends on social media or blown up into poster-sized prints.

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Line up the shot you want in Live View with virtually no wait for the EOS Rebel SL2 camera to focus thanks to Dual Pixel CMOS AF which helps deliver the world’s fastest autofocusing speed at 0.03 sec.^ Equipped with phase-detection, it can quickly and accurately determine how far away a subject is and where the lens should focus, and offers fast, smooth and precise autofocus that stays locked onto your subject, even if they are in motion, for both photos and videos. Dual Pixel CMOS AF helps ensure your results are sharp, keeps the time it takes to lock focus onto your subject to a minimum and smoothly maintains focus where you want it.

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The EOS Rebel SL2 camera features a Vari-angle Touch Screen LCD that can be ideal for composing and reviewing your photos. Tap the screen during Live View while taking photos or videos and thanks to Dual Pixel CMOS AF, the EOS Rebel SL2 will quickly lock focus to that location in the image. Touch gestures can be used for zooming in or swiping through images after you’ve taken them, and menu and quick control settings can be accessed quickly and easily. In addition, the Vari-angle Touch Screen LCD lets users utilize Selfie Mode with a touch of a button so you can capture high-quality selfie shots with ease.

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Built-in Wi-Fi®* Capability

The EOS Rebel SL2 camera is designed to make connecting to Wi-Fi®* fast and easy. It can exchange data with other Wi-Fi® compatible Canon cameras, and transfer files directly to a compatible smart device using the Camera Connect app. Just press the Wi-Fi® button and the camera will connect to Wi-Fi® allowing you to share and upload directly to various web services like CANON iMAGE GATEWAY#, Facebook® and YouTube® as well as print directly to compatible wireless Canon printers.

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Built-in NFC** Capability

 With its built-in NFC (Near Field Communication) capability**, the EOS Rebel SL2 camera connects directly to compatible Android devices as well as Canon’s Connect Station CS100 device by simply touching the NFC icon located on the camera to the device.

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Built-in Bluetooth®*** Capability

 Bluetooth®*** pairing helps you connect the camera to compatible smart devices using the free Canon Camera Connect app*. The Bluetooth® capability uses a low-energy connection that can be set to connect automatically upon discovery of the two devices and helps preserve battery life while maintaining a wireless connection. You can also establish a direct Wi-Fi® connection to use your phone as a viewfinder, as well as check and download previously captured photos and videos. In addition, Bluetooth® lets you connect to the optional Wireless Remote Control BR-E1 for remote shooting as well as pick up GPS shooting location data from the user’s compatible smartphone.

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The Canon EOS Rebel SL2 camera supports Full HD quality movies at 60p and can produce incredibly smooth moving images for playback, or for sharing videos on social media. Vloggers will appreciate the ease with which it can record quality audio that’s immediately ready for uploading. For even more sophisticated sound recording, the EOS Rebel SL2 has an external microphone input to complement its internal microphone.

sl2_feature_05.jpgThe DIGIC 7 Image Processor powers the Canon EOS Rebel SL2 camera to produce high image quality and fast operation, even in in low light. When using high ISO settings, the image processing helps keep results sharp and detailed in virtually any lighting situation. Powerful all around, the DIGIC 7 Image Processor helps ensure your photos and videos look sharp and lifelike with minimal noise or grain.

6dmk2_feature_04Especially useful when shooting in bright light, the Canon EOS Rebel SL2 camera incorporates a fully featured optical viewfinder with a wide-area, 9-point AF system designed to achieve sharp focus in an instant. This sophisticated AF system makes it easy to capture the action, no matter where the subject moves. 63-zone evaluative metering helps the EOS Rebel SL2 achieve optimal exposure with a diverse array of subjects and lighting conditions.

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With its Feature Assistant function, the EOS Rebel SL2 camera helps users take advantage of its advanced features and create impressive photos with ease. By explaining and illustrating the camera’s shooting modes and their effects with sample photos of each mode, Feature Assistant encourages experimentation and provides guidance for creating amazing photographs.

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The smallest and lightest EOS DSLR camera to feature both an APS-C sensor and a Vari-angle LCD, the EOS Rebel SL2 is easy to bring with you. With improvements in design and construction, the EOS Rebel SL2 is portable and lightweight with no compromise in performance. Its compact construction is accompanied by excellent usability, including a rounded grip that can sit comfortably in your hand. Conveniently sized for everyday use, the EOS Rebel SL2 means less missed opportunities and more memories preserved and shared in high image quality.

sl2_feature_09.jpgSo get ready to buy this most awaited DSLR from Canon from www.thirdidigital.in

 

Canon EOS 6D Mark II – an affordable full-frame DSLR

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Versatility Delivered

For superb performance on the go, the Canon EOS 6D Mark II camera puts full-frame performance into a compact, fully featured DSLR. Its 26.2 Megapixel CMOS sensor and DIGIC 7 Image Processor help deliver amazing results even at expanded ISO settings, making it great for challenging low-light situations as well as landscape, portrait and event photography. The EOS 6D Mark II also features an impressive optical viewfinder with 45 all cross-type AF points*, fast and accurate Dual Pixel CMOS AF and a Vari-angle Touch Screen LCD for Live View operation which helps create unique angles. With the EOS 6D Mark II’s speed to capture action and the versatility to create phenomenal photographs and Full HD 60p videos in numerous environments and lighting situations, the camera offers creative content makers a winning combination of advanced features in a portable package that’s as fun as it is powerful.

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The Canon EOS 6D Mark II features a 26.2 Megapixel full-frame CMOS sensor (approx. 35.9mm x 24.0mm) designed to create high-resolution and detailed images. Capable of sensitivities ranging from ISO 100 to ISO 40000 (expandable to L: 50 and H2: 102400), the EOS 6D Mark II’s sensor captures images of 6240 x 4160 pixels with a pixel size of 5.67 µm square for outstanding detail and a superb signal-to-noise ratio, resulting in great images. Combined with the EOS 6D Mark II’s compact and lightweight design, it helps make high-resolution photography easy and accessible.

6dmk2_feature_01.jpgFor next-level AF operation, the Canon EOS 6D Mark II camera has a wide-area, 45-point all cross-type AF system* which allows you to track fast subjects accurately throughout the frame and has low luminance performance to EV -3 which makes it excellent in dim light. Canon’s high-precision AF system, high-quality bright prism and Intelligent Viewfinder II let you see exactly what the lens sees. These features help provide instant information such as camera settings, with a limited chance of glare so you can easily see and quickly change settings on the spot no matter the shooting situation. The EOS 6D Mark II also features 5 types of AF area selection modes useful for a number of different AF situations.

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The Canon EOS 6D Mark II camera features Canon’s brilliant Dual Pixel CMOS AF for crisp Live View shooting. With two photodiodes per pixel capable of phase-difference detection autofocus, Dual Pixel CMOS AF delivers fast and accurate AF throughout the image plane. Able to detect shifts in movement at the pixel level, Dual Pixel CMOS AF enables continuous automatic AF and AF tracking that enhances overall camera operation for sharp still images and smooth, accurate focus transitions in movies, even at Full HD 60p.

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The DIGIC 7 Image Processor powers the Canon EOS 6D Mark II camera to produce high image quality and fast operation, even in in low light. The camera features a wide range of ISO 100–40000 for still and videos and it can help keep results sharp and detailed in virtually any lighting situation. Powerful all around, the EOS 6D Mark II can produce beautiful images even where light is limited.

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The Canon EOS 6D Mark II is the first full-frame Canon EOS DSLR camera to have a Vari-angle Touch Screen 3.0-inch ClearView LCD II monitor for composing and reviewing photos and movies with ease. Its touch sensitive controls make it easy to select and adjust focus, menu and quick control settings with a touch of a finger. Two-finger touch gestures can be used for zooming or changing images. The 1.04 million dot LCD monitor is constructed to help minimize reflections and treated with a smudge-resistant coating for a bright, clear and easily viewable display.

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Built-in Wi-Fi®** Connectivity

For a useful and quick workflow in a variety of locations, the Canon EOS 6D Mark II camera’s built-in Wi-Fi®** feature can help streamline camera operations across the board. Using the free Canon Camera Connect app** on a compatible iOS® or Android™ device, the EOS 6D Mark II can easily be set up to shoot remotely from a distance, even in Live View mode, with complete control of settings such as aperture, shutter speed, ISO, focus and shutter release. Image review and transfer are similarly fast and easy without having to take the camera out of its bag. Still images can even be transferred between two wireless-enabled Canon cameras over a Local Area Network (LAN). Images and video can also be uploaded instantly to CANON iMAGE GATEWAY# for easy sharing on social networking sites, and photos can even be printed on a wireless PictBridge-certified printer without the need for a PC.

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Built-in NFC*** Capability

Built-in NFC*** (Near Field Communication) technology helps provide the Canon EOS 6D Mark II camera with a virtually seamless connection to compatible Android™ devices***. Simply tap to connect and transfer images and videos. It’s also compatible with the Canon Connect Station CS100 device, which makes it simple for photographers and moviemakers to view and organize all their photos and videos on one connected device.

6dmk2_feature_06b.jpgBuilt-in Bluetooth®^ Capability

Bluetooth®^ pairing helps you connect the camera to compatible smart devices using the free Canon Camera Connect app. The Bluetooth® capability uses a low-energy connection that can be set to connect automatically upon pairing of the two devices and helps preserve battery life while maintaining a wireless connection. Bluetooth® lets you quickly and easily connect the EOS 6D Mark II camera to the optional Wireless Remote Control BR-E1 for remote shooting.

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Built-in GPS^^ Capability

When you’re capturing images while traveling on vacation or if you’re on the job, GPS has become an important and valuable tool. The EOS 6D Mark II camera’s built-in GPS helps content creators both tag their images with critical location data, and also adjust the time and timestamp on the camera automatically. Since it’s compatible with American GPS satellites, Russian GLONASS satellites and Japanese quasi-zenith satellites Michibiki, the GPS information can stay consistent and accurate.

6dmk2_feature_06d.jpgThe EOS 6D Mark II camera is designed to keep up with the action. Its remarkable shutter, advanced AF and exposure and image processing systems help ensure virtually instantaneous response and performance at up to 6.5 fps^^^, even at full resolution. Whether searching for candid moments at a wedding or capturing an athlete’s explosive motion, the EOS 6D Mark II doesn’t let file size compromise the speed of capture even when bracketing exposures of a complex lighting situation, helping photographers and moviemakers consistently attain high-quality and sharp images.

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The EOS 6D Mark II camera is built for uninterrupted performance, even when conditions get messy. The battery compartment cover, card slot cover, lens mount, terminal covers and buttons are weather-sealed to help keep water and dust out. The EOS 6D Mark II’s high precision aluminum alloy and polycarbonate resin construction ensures a lightweight and durable camera that gives you the confidence to use in various situations.

6dmk2_feature_08.jpgNow where to buy just wait it is being sold soon on www.thirdidigital.in

Tamron 18-400mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC HLD Lens Now Launched

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Tamron has unveiled a new all-in-one zoom lens called Tamron 18-400mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC HLD. The lens is designed for Canon and Nikon DSLR cameras with APS-c sized image sensor.

Weighing in at 705 grams, the 18-400mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC HLD is remarkably compact and lightweight for a lens covering such an extremely wide zoom range.  The focal length is equivalent to 29-640mm for Canon and 27-600mm for Nikon.

The optical construction of the lens comprises 16 lens elements in 11 groups. The use of specialised glass elements such as LD (Low Dispersion) and aspherical lens elements effectively minimises chromatic aberrations and geometric distortion. The AF drive system uses Tamron’s exclusive HLD (High/Low torque modulated Drive) motor. The power-saving HLD motor produces outstanding driving torque, and adjusts motor rotation from low to high speed to enable accurate and quiet focusing.

 

Tamron 18-400mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC HLD Lens Features

  1. The world’s first ultra-telephoto all-in-one zoom lens to achieve 400mm telephoto

The new Model B028 is the world’s first lens for APS-C DSLR cameras that covers a focal length range of 18-400mm and achieves a zoom ratio of 22.2x. The focal length of 400mm on the telephoto end enables the capturing of ultra-telephoto pictures with the 35mm equivalent of 620mm angle of view. Now, with just this one lens, a photographer can readily enjoy the power of ultra-telephoto to bring distant subjects closer as well as the perspective-flattening effects that only extreme telephoto settings can achieve. This all-in-one zoom lens is ideal for travel and everyday shooting. It allows a photographer to switch from wide-angle to ultra-telephoto without changing lenses, making it faster and easier to capture a much wider range of subjects including travel scenes, wildlife, action sports, landscapes, cityscapes, portraits and food. Among interchangeable lenses for DSLR cameras (As of May 2017; Tamron)

  1. Excellent image quality across the entire zoom range, from wide-angle to ultra-telephoto and macro

The optical construction of the B028 consists of 16 lens elements in 11 groups. The use of specialized glass elements such as LD (Low Dispersion) and aspherical lens elements effectively minimizes wide-ranging aberrations, including chromatic aberrations and distortion, thereby assuring outstanding image quality. Optimum power distribution among the individual lens element groups achieves both the optical performance and the compact size necessary for an ultra-telephoto all-in-one zoom lens that boasts 400mm focal length. Also, it enables tele-macro photography with a maximum magnification ratio of 1:2.9.

  1. Lightweight and compact design exhibits Tamron’s basic philosophy for all-in-one zoom lenses

Despite being an all-in-one zoom lens that achieves 400mm ultra-telephoto, Model B028 is light and compact with a total length of 4.8in. and a weight of 24.9oz.4 A new lens barrel design utilizing three-step extensions was developed to enable the necessary elongation to produce a 22.2x zoom ratio. Compared to the conventional approach, the division into a larger number of cams ensures comfortable operation and stability while zooming. Tamron’s philosophy for all-in-one zoom lenses is to allow each photographer to casually capture everyday photos with a lens of a practical size, and Model B028 fulfills this philosophy.

  1. HLD motor provides high-precision AF and enables compact lens construction

The AF drive system for Model B028 uses Tamron’s exclusive HLD (High/Low torque modulated Drive) motor. The power-saving HLD motor produces outstanding driving torque, and adjusts motor rotation from low to high speed to enable accurate and quiet focusing. The HLD motor takes up less space thanks to its small size and circular arc shape that allows the size of the lens to be reduced.

  1. Equipped with the Vibration Compensation system necessary for ultra-telephotography at 400mm

Despite its compact size, Model B028 is equipped with Tamron’s proprietary VC (Vibration Compensation) system, which effectively curbs camera shake under low light conditions (such as a dimly lit room or at dusk) and while taking ultra-telephoto pictures. This greatly expands opportunities for casual handheld shooting. The jitter-free stability of the viewfinder image allows for easier framing and enables the photographer to compose the subject quickly and comfortably.

  1. Electromagnetic diaphragm system now used also for Nikon-mount lenses

The electromagnetic diaphragm system, which has been a standard feature for Canon-mount lenses, is now employed in Nikon-mount lenses. More precise diaphragm and aperture control is possible because the diaphragm blades are driven and controlled by a motor through electronic pulse signals. Available only with cameras compatible with the electromagnetic diaphragm (D3100, D3200, D3300, D3400, D5000, D5100, D5200, D5300, D5500, D5600, D7000, D7100, D7200, D300S, D500) (As of May, 2017; Tamron) 

  1. User-friendly features for everyday comfortable use

With an eye toward active outdoor photography, Model B028 features Moisture-Resistant Construction to ensure worry-free shooting as well as confidence while shooting under adverse weather conditions. Also, the Zoom Lock mechanism prevents undesired movement of the lens barrel under its own weight when the camera is angled downward while walking.

  1. Compatible with TAP-in ConsoleTM, an optional accessory product

The optional TAP-in Console provides a USB connection to a personal computer, enabling the user to easily update the lens’s firmware as well as to customize features, including fine adjustments to the AF and VC.

  1. External design placing importance on functionality and ease of use

While inheriting the design that makes use of many organic curves and the delicately polished form down to fine details that characterize the SP lens series, the new Model B028 comes with a highly sophisticated design that also places a lot of importance on the lens’s functionality and ease of use, featuring an overall form that faithfully encompasses the internal structures within, a slim Luminous Gold brand ring and the switch shape design.

The Tamron 18-400mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC HLD will be available from July Onwards.

Camera Carnival Biggest Sale of the Year

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Telangana Photo Video Enthusiast this is the time when you can walk into IIIrdi The Best photography Stores in Twin Cities of Hyderabad Secunderabad  your Dream Camera DSLR or Compact or maybe the Great High Zoom Range, want to add a new Lens to your DSLR or buy a BackPack , Tripods, Filters, Flash ,LED Lights,Extension tube or just a Memory Card, there is no better time than June 2017 the entire store products are on Grand Sale, If I can tell in simple word it means LOOT LO sale of the decade.

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Do not wait for a good time it is now the Good Time , offer open till June 30, 2017 only subject to stock available , note no fresh stock will be added no bookings will be accepted so still waiting for what, this offer is only for walk in customers at the Stores not on website.

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All about Aperture the ‘f’ No in your DSLR

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Aperture is one of the three pillars of photography, the other two being ISO and Shutter Speed. Without a doubt, it is the most talked about subject, because aperture either adds a dimension to a photograph by blurring the background, or magically brings everything in focus. In this article, We will try to explain everything known about aperture in very simple language.

 

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Digital Camera Modes-Explained for You

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let us understand the digital camera modes is essential to control the exposure in photography. As a good Photographer, you should know what each camera mode does and when it should be used, under what circumstances.

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1) What are Digital Camera Modes?

Digital Camera Modes allow photographers to control the parameters of an exposure, specifically, Shutter Speed, Aperture and ISO. While certain modes can fully automate the camera exposure, there are other modes that let the photographer manually control some or all parameters of the exposure.

Today, most digital cameras have various types of camera modes that can be used in different situations. While most point and shoot cameras concentrate on automatic modes for simplicity’s sake, more advanced cameras feature modes that allow both automatic and manual exposure control.

2) Types of Camera Modes

Here are the four main types of camera modes that can be found in most digital cameras today:

  1. Program (P)
  2. Shutter Priority (Tv) or (S)
  3. Aperture Priority (Av) or (A)
  4. Manual (M)

3) Program Mode

In “Program” mode, the camera automatically chooses the Aperture and the Shutter Speed for you, based on the amount of light that passes through the lens. This is the mode you want to use for “point and shoot” moments, when you just need to quickly snap a picture. The camera will try to balance between aperture and shutter speed, increasing and decreasing the two based on the intensity of light. If you point the camera to a bright area, the aperture will automatically increase to a bigger number, while keeping the shutter speed reasonably fast. Pointing the camera to a darker area will decrease the aperture to a lower number, in order to maintain a reasonably fast shutter speed. If there is not enough light, the lens aperture will stay at the lowest number (maximum aperture), while the shutter speed will keep on decreasing until it reaches proper exposure.

I personally never use this mode, since it does not give me much control over the exposure. There is a way to override the camera-guessed shutter speed and aperture by moving the control dial (on Nikon cameras it is the dial on the back of the camera). If you rotate the control dial towards the left, the camera will decrease the shutter speed and increase the aperture. If you rotate the dial towards the right, the camera will increase the shutter speed and decrease the aperture. Basically, if you needed to get a faster shutter speed for freezing action, you would rotate the dial to the right, and if you needed to get a large depth of field, you would rotate the dial to the left.

4)Shutter-Priority Mode

In “Shutter Priority” mode, you manually set the camera’s shutter speed and the camera automatically picks the right aperture for you, based on the amount of light that passes through the lens. This mode is intended to be used when motion needs to be frozen or intentionally blurred. If there is too much light, the camera will increase the lens aperture to a higher number, which decreases the amount of light that passes through the lens. If there is not enough light, the camera will decrease the aperture to the lowest number, so that more light passes through the lens. So in Shutter Priority mode, the shutter speed stays the same (what you set it to), while aperture automatically increases and decreases, based on the amount of light. In addition, there is no control over subject isolation, because you are letting the camera control the depth of field.

I try not to use this mode either, because there is a risk of getting an overexposed or underexposed image. Why? Because if the amount of ambient light is not sufficient and I set the shutter speed to a really high number, my exposure will be limited to the aperture/speed of my lens. For example, if the maximum aperture of my lens is f/4.0, the camera will not be able to use a lower aperture than f/4.0 and will still shoot at the fast shutter speed that I manually set. The result will be an underexposed image. At the same time, if I use a very slow shutter speed when there is plenty of light, the image will be overexposed and blown out.

5) Aperture-Priority Mode

In “Aperture Priority” mode, you manually set the lens aperture, while the camera automatically picks the right shutter speed to properly expose the image. You have full control over subject isolation and you can play with the depth of field, because you can increase or decrease the lens aperture and let the camera do the math on measuring the right shutter speed. If there is too much light, the camera will automatically increase the shutter speed, while if you are in a low-light environment, the camera will decrease the shutter speed. There is almost no risk of having an overexposed or an underexposed image, because the shutter speed can go as low as 30 seconds and as fast as 1/4000-1/8000th of a second (depending on the camera), which is more than sufficient for most lighting situations.

This is the mode that I use 95% of the time, because I have full control over the depth of field and I know that the image will be properly exposed under normal circumstances. The metering systems in most modern cameras work very well and I let the camera calculate and control the shutter speed for me.

6) Manual Mode

As the name suggests, “Manual” mode stands for a full manual control of Aperture and Shutter Speed. In this mode, you can manually set both the aperture and the shutter speed to any value you want – the camera lets you fully take over the exposure controls. This mode is generally used in situations, where the camera has a hard time figuring out the correct exposure in extreme lighting situations. For example, if you are photographing a scene with a very bright area, the camera might incorrectly guess the exposure and either overexpose or underexpose the rest of the image. In those cases, you can set your camera to manual mode, then evaluate the amount of light in darker and brighter areas and override the exposure with your own settings. Manual mode is also useful for consistency, if you need to make sure that both shutter speed and aperture stay the same across multiple exposures. For example, to properly stitch a panorama, all shots that you are trying to put together need to have the same shutter speed and aperture. Otherwise, some images will be darker, while others are lighter. Once you set the shutter speed and aperture to the values of your choice in manual mode, your images will all have consistent exposures.

Happy Photography, please share your inputs & thoughts

Shutter Speed the important Element in Photographing Good Pictures

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Shutter Speed is one of the three pillars of photography, the other two being ISO and Aperture. Shutter speed is where the other side of the magic happens – it is responsible for creating dramatic effects by either freezing action or blurring motion. In this article, I will try to explain everything I know about shutter speed in very simple language.

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1) Understanding The Camera Shutter?

It is highly recommend reading about what a DSLR is and what it consists of. Simply put, a camera shutter is a curtain in front of the camera sensor that stays closed until the camera fires. When the camera fires, the shutter opens and fully exposes the camera sensor to the light that passes through the lens aperture. After the sensor is done collecting the light, the shutter closes immediately, stopping the light from hitting the sensor. The button that fires the camera is also called “shutter” or “shutter button”, because it triggers the shutter to open and close.

2) What is Shutter Speed?

Shutter speed, also known as “exposure time”, stands for the length of time a camera shutter is open to expose light into the camera sensor. If the shutter speed is fast, it can help to freeze action completely, as seen in the above photo of the dolphin. If the shutter speed is slow, it can create an effect called “motion blur”, where moving objects appear blurred along the direction of the motion. This effect is used quite a bit in advertisements of cars and motorbikes, where a sense of speed and motion is communicated to the viewer by intentionally blurring the moving wheels.

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Slow shutter speeds are also used to photograph lightning’s or other objects at night or in dim environments with a tripod. Landscape photographers intentionally use slow shutter speeds to create a sense of motion on rivers and waterfalls, while keeping everything else in focus.

Motion can also be frozen to an extent with a camera flash, even at low shutter speeds.

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It was getting dark and even after increasing the sensor sensitivity to ISO 800, the camera still needed at least 1/250th of a second to properly expose this bird. If I had shot the bird at that speed, the bird would have turned out to be blurry, since it moved faster than 1/250th of a second. I used an external flash and fired the camera at 1/250th of a second and as you can see, it helped me freeze motion, despite having a low shutter speed for a bird in flight.

All of the above is achieved by simply controlling the shutter speed. In summary, high shutter speeds freeze action, while low shutter speeds create an effect of motion.

3) How Shutter Speed is Measured

Shutter speeds are typically measured in fractions of a second, when they are under a second. For example 1/4 means a quarter of a second, while 1/250 means one two-hundred-and-fiftieth of a second or four milliseconds. Most modern DSLRs can handle shutter speeds of up to 1/4000th of a second, while some can handle much higher speeds of 1/8000th of a second and faster. The longest shutter speed on most DSLRs is typically 30 seconds (without using external remote triggers).

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4) Fast, Slow and Long Shutter Speeds

Fast shutter speed is typically whatever it takes to freeze action. For me, it is typically above 1/500th of a second for general photography and above 1/1000th of a second for bird photography.

Slow shutter speed is considered to be the slowest shutter speed that you can handle without introducing camera shake. Some of Nikon’s lenses such as the Nikon 70-200mm VR II have special image stabilization (also known as “vibration reduction”) technologies within the lens that can help photographers take pictures at very slow shutter speeds when hand-holding cameras, without introducing camera shake. Although it is important to know how to hold a camera, image stabilization can significantly help in reducing blur from shaky hands, thus allowing one to shoot at shutter speeds that normally would not be considered to be “safe” under the reciprocal rule.

How about long shutter speed? Long shutter speeds are typically above 1 second, when you have to use a tripod to get acceptably sharp images (for low-light/night photography or to capture movement).

5) How to Set Shutter Speed

Most cameras handle shutter speeds automatically through in-camera metering. When the camera is set to “Auto” mode, both shutter speed and aperture are automatically selected by the camera. When you shoot in “Aperture Priority” mode, you set the lens aperture, while the camera automatically sets the shutter speed.

There are two ways to manually set the shutter speed:
a) By setting the camera to “Shutter Priority” mode, where you set the shutter speed and the camera automatically selects the aperture.
b) By setting the camera to “Manual” mode, where you set both shutter speed and aperture manually.

I recommend letting the camera select the correct shutter speed for you. I personally shoot in “Aperture Priority” mode 99% of the time and I let my camera calculate the shutter speed for me.

6) How to Find Shutter Speed

Do you know how to find out what your camera shutter speed is set to? It is typically very easy to find the shutter speed. On Nikon DSLRs that have a top panel, the shutter speed is typically located on the top left corner:

If you look through the viewfinder, it should also be the number on the bottom left side of the screen. On most DSLRs, you will not see the shutter speed as a fraction of a second – it will typically be a regular number. When the shutter speed is slower than or equals to one second, you will see something like 1″ or 5″ (the ” sign indicates a full second).

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If you still cannot find the shutter speed, set your camera to “Aperture Priority” mode, then look into the viewfinder and point at a really dark area. Remember the numbers in the display, then switch to a very bright area and see what number changes. The number that changes is your shutter speed.

Happy Photography, Please share your inputs on this.