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Nikon D850 The Gamechanger Full Frame DSLR

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The Nikon D850 is Nikon’s latest high resolution full-frame DSLR, boasting a 46MP backside-illuminated CMOS sensor. But, in a fairly radical departure for the series, it is also one of the company’s fastest-shooting DSLRs. This combination of properties should significantly widen the camera’s appeal to high-end enthusiasts as well as a broad range of professional photographers.

Key Specifications:

  • 45.7MP BSI CMOS sensor
  • 7 fps continuous shooting with AE/AF (9 with battery grip and EN-EL18b battery)
  • 153-point AF system linked to 180,000-pixel metering system
  • UHD 4K video capture at up to 30p from full sensor width
  • 1080 video at up to 120p, recorded as roughly 1/4 or 1/5th speed slow-mo
  • 4:2:2 8-bit UHD uncompressed output while recording to card
  • 1 XQD slot and 1 UHS II-compliant SD slot
  • Battery life rated at 1840 shots
  • 3.2″ tilting touchscreen with 2.36M-dot (1024×768 pixel) LCD
  • Illuminated controls
  • 19.4MP DX crop (or 8.6MP at 30fps for up to 3 sec)
  • SnapBridge full-time Bluetooth LE connection system with Wi-Fi
  • Advanced time-lapse options (including in-camera 4K video creation)
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High resolution

The use of a backside illuminated (BSI) sensor means that the light collecting elements of the sensor are closer to the surface of the chip. This should not only increase the efficiency of the sensor (improving low light performance) but should also be expected to make the pixels near the edges of the sensor better able to accept light approaching with high angles of incidence, improving peripheral image quality.

Like the D810 before it, the D850 continues to offer an ISO 64 mode, that allows it to tolerate more light in bright conditions.

The D850 has gained a more usable electronic first curtain shutter option, which can now be used quiet shutter mode, as well as live view and Mirror-Up mode. To get the full benefit, though, you need to turn on exposure delay (which has had two sub-second delay settings added). However, exposure delay persists across all shooting modes. Thankfully, and presumably thanks to a redesigned shutter and mirror mechanism, our quick check with a pre-production model suggests shutter shock may not be an issue, even without engaging it.

The D850 has no anti-aliasing filter, which should allow for slightly finer detail capture but with added risk of moiré, if any of your lenses are sharp enough to out-resolve a 45.7MP full-frame sensor. There’s still no sign of the clever design Nikon patented so, unlike the Pentax K-1 or Sony RX1R II, you can’t engage an anti-aliasing effect if you do find false color appearing in densely patterned areas.

High Speed

In addition to the increased speed, the D850 also gains the full AF capabilities of the company’s flagship sports camera: the D5. This includes all the hardware: AF module, metering sensor and dedicated AF processor, as well as the full range of AF modes and configuration options, which should translate to comparable focus performance combined with high resolution.

Given the D5 possessed one of the best AF systems we’ve ever seen and could continue to offer that performance in a wide range of conditions and shooting scenarios with minimal need for configuration, this is an exciting prospect.

As part of this system, the D850 gains the automated system for setting an AF Fine Tune value. It only calibrates the lens based on the central AF point and for a single distance, but it’s a simple way to ensure you’re getting closer to your lenses’ full capabilities, which is handy given you’ll now be able to scrutinize their performance with 46MP of detail.

Impressively, the D850 can shoot at nine frames per second if you add the optional MB-D18 battery grip and buy an EN-EL18b battery, as used in the D5. As well as increasing the camera’s burst rate, this combination also ups the battery life to a staggering 5140 shots per charge. You don’t get this same boost in speed or endurance if you use a second EN-EL15a in the grip, though.

An MB-D18 plus an EN-EL18b is likely to set you back over $580 over and above the cost of the camera body ($399 for the grip, around $149 for the battery, $30 for the BL-6 battery chamber cover plus the cost of a charger).

The D850 also includes a sufficiently deep buffer to allow fifty-one 14-bit losslessly compressed Raw files, meaning the majority of photographers are unlikely to hit its limits.

Video capabilities

In terms of video the D850 becomes the first Nikon DSLR to capture 4K video from the full width of its sensor. The camera can shoot at 30, 25 or 24p, at a bitrate of around 144 Mbps. It can simultaneously output uncompressed 4:2:2 8-bit UHD to an external recorder while recording to the card.

At 1080 resolution, the camera can shoot at up to 60p, with a slow-mo mode that can capture at 120 frames per second before outputting at either 25 or 24p. The 1080 mode also offers focus peaking and digital stabilization, neither of which are available for 4K shooting.

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Body & Camera Features

The D850’s body is primarily made from magnesium alloy and fairly closely resembles the D810. The newer model gains a D750-style flip up/down cradle for its rear screen, which is not only much higher in resolution but also touch sensitive. Unlike the D5 and D500, this touch sensitivity can be used in live view mode and for navigating menus, as well as for in playback mode.

The camera’s grip has been reworked, making it more comfortable than the D810 when holding the camera for long periods or with heavy lens combinations.

The most obvious visual difference between the cameras is a different viewfinder hump, with the new camera having no built-in flash. Instead, strobe users will have to make do with the flash sync socket or purchase the WR- radio control trigger set (the WR-A10, WR-R10 and WR-T10 that allow remote triggering of the camera or remote control of radio compatible flashguns such as the Speedlight SB-5000).

Nikon says that the removal of the onboard flash allows the D850 to be better weather-sealed than the D810, since there are fewer seams on the top of the camera to protect against moisture ingress.

Autofocus hardware

As with the Nikon D5, the D850 has a 153-point AF system featuring 99 cross-type points. The central AF point is rated as working in light as low as -4EV, with the rest still active at -3EV (and, since the metering sensor is meant to work down to this level too, it may still be possible to use the camera’s 3D tracking mode in these very low light conditions). Fifteen of the camera’s AF points clustered near the center of the frame will work with lens + teleconverter combinations with maximum apertures of just F8, which should make it useful for pursuits such as birding.

This Multi-Cam 20K AF system, like the D5’s, offers a good degree of frame coverage for a full frame camera: 30% wider than on the D810, the company says. The move from the D810’s 91,000-pixel metering sensor to the D5’s 180,000-pixel chip should improve subject recognition. This and the inclusion of a dedicated AF processor means the D850 should be a match for the D5, which can keep AF points on a moving subject even in continuous shooting, rather than subject tracking performance dropping noticeably during bursts, as the D810’s did.

So far as we understand, the only significant difference between the D850’s AF system and the D5’s is the viewfinder display. The D5 has an organic electro-luminescent display layer that allows it to light the active AF points as they change in 3D tracking mode, the D850 has an LCD layer on which the points only light up when they’re manually moved or when focus is initiated or acquired.

Viewfinder

The removal of the camera’s built-in flash frees up room for a new viewfinder, so magnification is able to leap from 0.7x to 0.75x which is the largest optical viewfinder on any Nikon DSLR. The larger finder, which features a new condenser lens and an aspherical element in the design, retains a reasonable (17mm) eye point, as we understand, so the whole scene should be visible even for most glasses wearers.

Time-lapse

As with previous Nikon cameras, the D850 has intervalometer functions built in, so that you can capture time lapses without any external accessories. This feature can be combined with the camera’s silent shutter live view mode, to avoid vibration or excessive wear on the mechanical shutter, though with the risk of rolling shutter.

The camera can either assemble the images together in a 4K video or retain the full resolution files, to allow you to create a full resolution time-lapse in third-party software. Nikon uses the camera’s high resolution to brand this second capability as “8K Timelapse,” since the images exceed the 7680 × 4320 dimension of that video format.

Like previous Nikons, the intervalometer lets you specify the number of shots and the delay between them but now adds the ability to create a new folder and reset the file numbering for each time lapse sequence, so that the files can easily be isolated and transferred to 3rd-party software.

Focus shift

The D850 can also use this ‘new folder and reset the counter’ approach for another of its features. The Focus Shift mode prompts the camera to shoot a series of photos at different focus distances. You can specify the number of images, the size of the distance steps and whether there’s a delay between each shot. Unlike the similar feature on Olympus and Panasonic cameras, the Nikon can’t combine the resultant images, but it can place them in a separate folder to make it easy to import them into 3rd-party focus stacking software.

We’re told the focus steps will be selected on a dimensionless 0-10 scale, presumably because the distance of the increments will vary depending on the type of lens you use.

SnapBridge

The D850 includes Nikon’s SnapBridge connectivity system. This establishes a full-time Bluetooth LE connection between the camera and compatible smart devices. This is a step forward from the D810, which had no built-in wireless options, however, we have not found the SnapBridge system to be a good match for high-end systems in the past.

Existing implementations of SnapBridge lean very heavily towards using the Bluetooth connection to transfer images (unlike Samsung and Canon’s approaches, which use it just to keep lines of communication open, so that Wi-Fi communication can be established more rapidly). The camera can transfer every image it shoots automatically either at 2MP or in full resolution, but only over Bluetooth. Select the images on the camera and those will be sent (slowly) over Bluetooth, too. The only way of accessing Wi-Fi and its greater transfer speed is to use the app to browse your memory card and select from there.
Without a significant reworking of the SnapBridge app, we are concerned that the combination of a high-speed 46MP camera and a primarily Bluetooth-based connection with no ability to send Raw files will be inappropriate for the typical D850 user.

…it could really be a camera for all seasons 

The Sony a99 II showed it was possible to offer high resolution images and fast shooting, but the D850 takes this a step further. There are some ‘ifs,’ of course, but if the sensor can offer the low ISO image quality of the D810 combined with the AF of the D5 at between seven and nine frames per second, then it could really be a camera for all disciplines, from high res studio work to street fashion, weddings, sports, landscapes…

Whether it lives up to this promise will come down to the implementation, and it’s what we’ve experienced of this, hands-on, that leaves us impressed. For a start, it seems that a revised shutter and mirror mechanism has resolved the shock issues the D810 exhibited with longer lenses. This is a critical improvement for such a high resolution camera and one that isn’t directly covered in the specs, but our quick shots suggest it’s done the job.

We weren’t able to examine the camera’s high ISO performance, but a quick check at base ISO suggests the ISO 64 mode does offer a DR advantage over ISO 100, which is what allowed the D810 to match the dynamic range performance of the GFX 50S and Pentax 645Z. We’ve also not had a chance to check the shadows, so this is a very preliminary impression, but ISO 64 does seem to be a ‘real’ sensitivity setting (i.e., not just ISO 100, but clipping earlier).

 

 

Composition Tips, to make your pictures more interesting

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One of the first qualities of a photo that catches and captures a viewer’s eye is the composition. Great composition is something that immediately separates the amateurs from the pros and enthusiasts. How you place various objects in the photographic frame determines the composition and works tremendously toward creating a feeling greater than what the object would convey in the real world. Composition is one of the most important elements of the craft of photography, and it is a skill that can be taught and honed through extensive exercise and persistent practice.

Fill The Frame / Cropping
If your shot is in danger of losing impact due to a busy background/surroundings, crop in tight around your main point of focus, eliminating the background so all attention falls on your main subject. This works particularly well with portraits when you’re trying to capture something more intimate and focused or are shooting in a busy location where what’s around them would just cause a distraction. Filling the frame could involve you capturing them from the waist up or for more impact, fill the frame with just their face. Patterns are another subject that when capturing, you should fill the frame with, aligning it up carefully to ensure it’s straight.

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To raise the quality of your photos you must make sure that the main subject is of heightened interest and is effectively positioned in the frame to draw the viewer’s eye exactly to where you want it, and emphasize that subject. This can be done in a variety of creative, artistic and symbolic ways. Size, color, shape and how the object contrasts with the rest of the elements in the image (foreground, middle ground and background) are ways to isolate and direct attention to the subject.

Balanced Layout including the Subject with other Elements

The layout of your images influences how visually effective or stimulating your photos will be. When composing your photo, seek a balance in the color, the lighting, and object placement within the frame’s constricting rectangle. When we talk about “balance” in a photograph, we mean a composition that has arranged the visual elements in such a way as to be pleasing to the eye. We’ve all seen group photos (of friends and family) in which the subjects are stuck in the center of the frame with no apparent design other than to fit everyone in the frame, and without regard to effectively filling the frame either. This typical shot lacks interesting composition in the layout, and there’s probably way too much empty space above their heads as well. You seek to achieve interesting composition and perspective by being creative with where and how you physically position the camera, such that the composition has a unique perspective, or view of the world. For example, if you put the camera at the level of the floor when your pet or baby approaches the camera, that photo has a much more interesting composition and perspective than if the camera were held at full height while looking down at the pet or baby. Like many art concepts, perspective and composition is either instinctual, or it can be developed through practice and study.

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Keep an eye on the edges of your frame to make sure the person/animal you’re photographing hasn’t had any of their body parts chopped off by it. Cutting off your cat’s tail, your dog’s ears or even part of your model’s head, will not only spoil your shot, the unintentional limb chopping can pull attention away from what the viewer should really be looking at.

What is all about Rule of Third

Understand The Rule Of Thirds
The most basic of all photography rules is all about dividing your shot into nine equal sections by a set of vertical and horizontal lines. With the imaginary frame in place, you should place the most important element(s) in your shot on one of the lines or where the lines meet. It’s a technique that works well for landscapes as you can position the horizon on one of the horizontal lines that sit in the lower and upper part of the photograph while you’re vertical subjects (trees etc.) can be placed on one of the two vertical lines.

compo3.jpgThis is an artistic concept that photographers lifted from painters, which one uses a frame (like a water, the boatman, & Sky ) within the overall frame to further isolate an object/subject. The key to using a frame within a frame is to make sure that the frame is distinct in shape and lines, and is in sharp focus. Your viewer’s attention will immediately be taken to exactly what you want them to see by using this technique.

Keep your depth of Field view 

Make The Most Of Lead In Lines / ShapesOur eyes are unconsciously drawn along lines in images so by thinking about how, where and why you place lines in your images will change the way your audience view it. A road, for example, starting at one end of the shot and winding its way to the far end will pull the eye through the scene. You can position various focal points along your line or just have one main area focus at the end of your line that the eye will settle on. Shapes can be used in a similar way, for example imagine a triangle and position three points of focus at the end of each point where the lines of the shape meet. By doing so you create balance in your shot as well as subtly guiding the eye.

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A photograph can have a blurry foreground or background, so this special optical property can enhance the composition of your photos by further isolating the main subject from everything else around it. You can blur the background or foreground by having command over the depth of field, which is controlled by the lens’ aperture, focal length and object’s distance from the lens. Mastering this skill is critical for more interesting images. The wider apertures (f/1.4 to f/2.8) effectively reduce DOF, as do longer focal length lenses

Create the effect of The Background Magic

Unsightly objects, overexposed or particularly bright areas and blocks/dots of bright colour will all pull the eye from what it’s meant to be focusing on so take a good look at your background before you take your shot and if possible, find a background that’s not so obtrusive. If you’re working on portraits make sure there’s no unwanted items sticking out of your subject’s head and unless it adds to the shot, throw the background out of focus. To do this, select a wider aperture if working with a DSLR or select the Portrait Mode on a compact camera to tell it you want to work with a wider aperture.

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Perspective is how the photographer views the objects in the camera frame via the placement of the camera. For example, the same subject will have different perspectives when photographed at eye level, from above or from ground level. By varying the perspective you change the placement of the horizon line and you influence your audience’s perception of the scene. For example, if you placed the camera on the ground level to take a full-body photo of someone, and angled the camera up to fill the frame with your subject, he or she will appear much more menacing, powerful and larger than if the camera was held at eye-level. Another way to look at differing perspective is to utilize camera positions that are atypical to what the human eye sees. Bird’s eye views or extremely high angles change the dynamics of your composition.

So let us conclude with 1 Mantra , Keep it Simple

The concept of less is more lends itself effectively to just about everything, and photography is no exception. Overly complicated or complex photographic composition has the same problem as compound complicated sentences in writing, which make it difficult for the audience to understand and appreciate the idea that is trying to be conveyed. Simple in this context doesn’t mean simplistic, but rather lacking unnecessary elements that confuse or are redundant. In photography creating uncluttered, but distinct compositions simplify yet enhance the delivery of the idea. The mind’s eye of the viewer can do all the heavy lifting.

 

 

Spark from DJI’s is the latest, cheapest and tiniest drone for now..

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In past few months, the biggest trend in the drone industry has been shrinking the size of the units to make them more portable and available. As DJI unveiled its latest aircraft, the Spark, a mini drone that weighs in at less than a single pound (0.6 pounds, to be exact). But just as it did with the Mavic Pro, the company has managed to squeeze a ton of powerful feAlong with its form factor, the other thing DJI managed to shrink on this unit was the price. Until now, every new unit the company released has started close to $1,000. The Spark will cost just $499, putting it up against cheaper units from Parrot, Yuneec, and ZeroTech.

The Spark will have an intelligent fight controls like ActiveTrack and TapFly, which were already present in DJI’s premium Phantom 4 drone. You can use gesture control to manoeuvre the drone in any direction, Jedi-style, or use a smartphone to control it up to 109 yards away. Battery life clocks in at 16 minutes of flight time on a single charge, but you can charge on the go with a Micro USB. DJI will be selling an accessories package that includes a charging hub, propeller guards, an extra battery you can swap out from the Spark, a remote control.

Spark’s camera is supported by a two-axis gimbal and can capture 1080p video and 12-megapixel still photos. A new feature called QuickShot lets the drone shoot one minute of footage and edit it down to 10 seconds for you to share. The Spark has onboard sensors that allow it to dodge obstacles, with the drone’s top speed maxing out at 31 miles per hour.

Great news is that It will be available in five colors: Alpine White, Sky Blue, Meadow Green, Lava Red, and Sunrise Yellow.

So keep waiting we shall share more news and delivery updates soon ….

www.thirdidigital.in

 

 

Relive your adventures with the TG-5.The definitive high-image-quality Tough camera.

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Whether it be in the mountains, on the beach, or in the snow, the Tough series can withstand the most punishing environments. The TG-5 is the pinnacle of the Tough series, and its new image sensor and new TruePic VIII image processor deliver significant improvements to image quality. It is equipped with a Field Sensor System which records various field data so you can recreate the shooting experience on your smartphone. Take this camera with you to make outdoor activities, such as mountain climbing and diving, even more fun.

Further advanced image quality and Tough performance

The TG-5 is equipped with the latest image sensor and image processor, and a bright f/2.0 high-resolution lens for high image quality. Its Tough performance and anti-fog dual-pane protective glass make for worry-free use in the harshest environments.

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The Field Sensor System lets you relive your experiences

Data, such as latitude/longitude, temperature, and altitude/depth, recorded by the Field Sensor System during your shoot can be imported to your smartphone using the Olympus Image Track app to realistically recreate the experience of shooting.

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4K Movie Compatibility

The TG-5 features significant improvements in video recording. It is compatible with 4K Movie which provides the ability to capture a greater level of detail in your videos. High-speed Movie is also supported, providing 120-fps recording capability at Full HD resolution.

The Variable Macro System expands macro photography

The Variable Macro System consists of four shooting modes for expanded macro photography and two separately available accessories for close-up shooting. This system makes it possible to capture photos of the tiniest details that cannot be seen with the naked eye.

Versatile shooting modes for creative expression

The TG-5 is packed with a variety of shooting modes such as Underwater Mode optimised for underwater photography, and Pro Capture for capturing split-second movement. With these features, more creative expression can be achieved easily.

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Superb controls and system expandability

Photography in the most punishing environments require excellent controls and system expandability. The TG-5 camera design has been improved with this in mind, for easier use and more versatile shooting.

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Will Be soon  available on www.thirdidigital.in

Nikon D7500 vs Canon 77D What is the right choice

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Let’s have a transitory look at the main features of Nikon D7500 vs Canon 77D. So, what may be the main differences when consider their specs list has got to offer.

If you’re trying to decide which one to buy as your first camera, here are the variances of Nikon D7500 vs Canon 77D cameras. Our comparison table below covers all the important specifications like sensor, image size, shooting speed, lcd size etc..

Nikon D7500 vs Canon 77D Comparison Table

Features Nikon D7500 Canon 77D
Sensor resolution 20.9MP APS-C CMOS 24.2-Megapixels
AA Filter No Yes
Max Image Resolution 5568 x 3712 6000 x 4000
Image Processor EXPEED 5 Dual DIGIC 7
ISO ISO 50 (exp)/ISO 100 – ISO 51200/ISO 1,640,000 (exp) 100 – 25,600 Boost: 51,200
AF System Multi-CAM 3500FX II 51 point AF (15 cross-type) Phase Detection 45 point all cross-type AF system
LCD 3.2″ / 8 cm Titling touchscreen 921,600 dots 3″ Rear Touchscreen Swivel LCD (1,040,000)
Viewfinder Optical 100% coverage 0.94x/0.63 x Optical (Pentaprism) 0.82x magnification 95% coverage
Shutter Speed 30-1/8000 sec 30 – 1/4000 sec
Flash X Sync Speed 1/250 sec 1/200 sec
Burst Speed 8fps 6fps
Exposure Compensation ±5 (at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps) ±5 (at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps)
Video Recording (max. res) H.264 QuickTime MOV 4K UHD/30p, 25p, 24p 1920×1080 (60/50/30/25/24p)
Time Lapse Yes Yes
Jpeg Buffer Size 100 Unlimited
RAW Buffer Size 50 27
SD Slots 1 SD slot with uHS-I support 1 SD slot with uHS-I support
Mic Input Yes Yes
Headphone Jack Yes No
Wireless Connectivity Wi-Fi with Snapbridge Wi-Fi + NFC + Bluetooth
USB Charge Yes Yes
Environmentally Sealed Yes No
Battery Life 950 shots 600 shots
Dimensions 136 x 104 x 73 mm 131.0 x 99.9 x 76.2 mm
Weight 22.58 oz (640g) 19.0 oz (540g)
     

 

 

Canon unveils 5D Mark IV

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The Canon EOS 5D Series is perhaps one of the most recognisable camera lines of the digital age and the Mark IV is designed to appeal to the same wide range of enthusiasts and professionals.

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Nearly identical-looking to its successor, it receives significant upgrades under the hood, including: a higher-resolution sensor with Dual Pixel autofocus, 4K video capture, an upgraded AF system, a touchscreen, improved weather-sealing, built-in Wi-Fi/NFC and GPS. All this adds up to a camera that fits into Canon’s product line nicely as the all-around full-frame option.

It is built around a new 30.4MP CMOS sensor and uses the Digic 6+ processor. The AF system is from the flagship 1D X Mark II and contains 61 AF points (41 of which are cross-type) with up to 24% expanded vertical coverage compared with the system in the Mark III. The centre point is sensitive to -3EV in One Shot (AF-S) mode (in Live View the sensor is sensitive to -4EV with a fast lens).

4K video capture is a welcome addition to this camera and users can record in either 24 or 30p, albeit with a 1.64x crop. All footage is captured as Motion JPEG. Additionally, the camera allows for 4K Frame Grabs, effectively giving users 30 fps stills shooting with (Dual Pixel) AF. The usefulness of this may depend on how well-controlled the camera’s rolling shutter is, and how acceptable 8.8MP, ~17:9 JPEGs are to you, but we’ve been impressed by how effective 4K/60p video capture on the 1D X II has been for capturing the decisive moment still.

While developing the IV, Canon says it sought comment from 5D-series users and found that dynamic range, resolution, AF precision and AF speed were the four most important areas improvements were requested. On paper, the Mark IV seems to address these aspects nicely:

Canon 5D Mark IV Key Specifications

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  • New 30.4MP CMOS full-frame sensor with Dual Pixel AF
  • DCI 4K 30/24p video using Motion JPEG + 4K Frame Grab
  • 61-point AF system with 41 cross-type sensors (center point sensitive to -3 EV)
  • Dual Pixel AF (sensitive to -4EV) for continuous Servo AF in stills (first for a full-frame Canon camera) and video
  • ISO 100-32000 (expandable to 102400)
  • 7 fps continuous shooting
  • Dual Pixel Raw (image micro adjustment, bokeh shift, ghosting reduction)
  • 150,000-pixel RGB+IR metering sensor
  • 1.62M-dot 3.2″ full-time touchscreen
  • Wi-Fi w/ NFC + GPS
  • Built-in bulb timer interval timers
  • Improved weather-sealing

The 30.4MP chip offers a decent jump in resolution over the 22.3MP chip in 5D III. And judging from the improved dynamic range in Canon’s other recent DSLRs (the 80D and 1D X II), expect Raw dynamic range in the IV to be much improved over its predecessor, which had some of the worst shadow noise and banding we’d seen in a modern full-frame digital camera. The improvement is thanks to the recent move to a design that uses on-chip analog to-digital-conversion, resulting in lower downstream read noise and therefore less shadow noise and better overall dynamic range at lower ISOs.

In terms of AF, the increased coverage area is definitely a big deal: after all, it’s the exact same AF system found in the company’s flagship sports camera. The 150,000-pixel RGB-IR metering sensor, which feeds scene information to the AF system, is borrowed from the original 1D X, bringing enhanced subject identification (including faces) and tracking (‘iTR’), as well as improved metering and flicker detection.

Compared to its legacy

Canon now offers a range of full-frame models. On the high end you have the Canon’s sports and action-oriented 1D X Mark II, with its 20.2MP sensor and 14 fps continuous shooting (with AF). The 5DS (and ‘R’ variant), with their 50.6MP sensors, are the company’s high resolution options. The 5D Mark IV splits the difference in terms of resolution and is positioned as Canon’s all-rounder. For those on a budget, the compact EOS 6D soldiers on, four years after its introduction.

The new Canon EOS 5D Mark IV must be available post Photokina in the market by September 2016 end and will be available on www.thirdidigital.in

Canon 5D Mark IV

Product Review: Sony A6300 Mirrorless Camera

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The Sony a6300 is the company’s latest mid-range mirrorless camera. Like the a6000 it still offers 24MP resolution but the autofocus ability, video capability, build quality, viewfinder resolution and price have all been higher.

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The most exciting change from our perspective is the a6300’s new sensor. Although the pixel count remains the same, the a6300’s sensor has a monstrous 425 phase-detection AF points ranged across the sensor. The a6000 already offered one of the best AF systems in its class, when it comes to identifying and tracking subjects, so an upgrade in this area sounds extremely promising. The sensor is also built using newer fabrication processes that use copper wiring to help improve the sensor’s performance and possibly contributing to the camera’s slightly improved battery life.

The a6000 has been a huge success and has dominated its field to the extent that its combination of capability and price still looks impressive even as it enters the twilight of its career (Sony says it will live on, alongside the a6300*). That model represented a dip down-market for the series, with a drop in build quality and spec relative to the NEX-6 that preceded it. The a6300 corrects that course, and sees the model regain the high resolution viewfinder and magnesium-alloy build offered by the older NEX-6 (and the level gauge, which was absent from the a6000).

Key features:

  • 24MP Exmor CMOS sensor
  • 425 phase detection points to give ‘4D Focus’ Hybrid AF
  • 4K (UHD) video – 25/24p from full width, 30p from smaller crop
  • 2.36M-dot OLED finder with 120 fps mode
  • Dust and moisture resistant magnesium-alloy body
  • Built-in Wi-Fi with NFC connection option
  • Built-in microphone socket

As with the previous 6-series E-mount cameras, the a6300 features a flip up/down 16:9 ratio screen. The shape of this screen hints at the 6300’s intended uses: video shooting, as well as stills. The a6300’s movie features have been considerably uprated. It not only shoots 4K (UHD) at 24p or 25p from its full sensor width (or 30p from a tighter crop). It also gains a mic socket, the video-focused Picture Profile system (which includes the flat S-Log2 and S-Log3 gamma curves), and the ability to record time code.

This added emphasis on video makes absolute sense, since the camera’s stills performance is likely to be competitive with the best on the market but its video capabilities trounce most of its current rivals. The a6300 not only includes focus peaking and zebra stripes but, if its on-sensor phase detection works well, the ability to re-focus as you shoot with minimal risk of focus wobble and hunting, should make it easier to shoot great-looking footage.

All this makes it hard to overstate how promising the a6300 looks. A latest-generation sensor can only mean good things for the camera’s image quality and an autofocus system that moves beyond the performance of one of our benchmark cameras is an enticing prospect. Add to that excellent, well-supported video specifications, a better viewfinder and weather-sealed build, and it’s tempting to start planning for the camera’s coronation as King of the APS-C ILCs. Perhaps with only the price tag floating over proceedings, threatening just a little rain on that particular parade.

Specifications compared:

As well as comparing the a6300 with the a6000 as its predecessor/sister model, we’ll also look at what you get if you save up a bit more money and opt for full-frame, rather than APS-C. We think at least some enthusiast users will find themselves making this decision, so are highlighting the differences.

  Sony a6000 Sony a6300 Sony a7 II
MSRP (Body Only) $650 $1000 $1700
Sensor size APS-C (23.5 x 15.6mm) APS-C (23.5 x 15.6mm) Full Frame (35.8 x 23.9 mm)
Pixel count 24MP 24MP 24MP
AF system Hybrid AF
(with 179 PDAF points)
Hybrid AF
(with 425 PDAF points)
Hybrid AF
(with 117 PDAF points)
Continuous shooting rate 11 fps 11 fps 5 fps
Screen 3″ tilting 921k dot LCD 3″ tilting 921k dot LCD 3″ tilting 1.23m dot LCD
Viewfinder OLED 1.44M-dot OLED 2.36M-dot w/120 fps refresh option OLED 2.36M-dot
Movie Resolution 1920 x 1080 / 60p 4K 3840 x 2160 / 30p, 1920 x 1080 / 120p, 60p 1920 x 1080 / 60p
Image stabilization In-lens only In-lens only In-body 5-axis
Number of dials Two Two Three (plus Exp Comp.)
Maximum shutter speed 1/4000 sec 1/4000 sec 1/8000 sec
Built-in flash  Yes Yes No
Hot shoe Yes Yes Yes
Flash sync speed 1/160 sec 1/160 sec 1/250 sec
Battery life
(with EVF)
360 shots
(310 shots)
400 shots
(350 shots)
350 shots
(270 shots)
Weight (w/battery) 344 g (12.1 oz) 404 g (14.3 oz) 599 g (21.1 oz)
Dimensions 120 x 67 x 45 mm (4.7 x 2.6 x 1.8 in.) 120 x 67 x 49 mm (4.7 x 2.6 x 1.9 in.) 127 x 96 x 60 mm (5 x 3.8 x 2.4 in.)

This model is now available for Indian Buyers on www.thirdidigital.in

MRP: Rs.74,990/-
Get it here for Rs.68,991/- http://bit.ly/1SiKWWi